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Winter Weather in Tulsa, OK Means Increased Risk of Motor Vehicle Crashes

Posted on January 27, 2020

Another round of severe winter weather is on its way to Northeastern Oklahoma, according to Tulsa’s NBC affiliate News Channel 2 KJRH, which reported that the city is well-prepared to handle precipitation and blizzard conditions. With crews covering 35 snow removal routes, equipment to clear 2,000 miles of roadway, and 12,500 tons of salt, officials are hopeful that they can reduce the potential for serious accidents.

Still, it is not possible to completely eliminate the risk of motor vehicle crashes, especially as several more severe weather incidents will follow as Winter 2019-2020 continues on into Spring.

Statistics compiled by the US Department of Transportation reveal that around 22 percent of all auto collisions occur because of weather. Snow in particular creates extremely slippery and unpredictable conditions, often leading to pile-ups involving multiple cars, trucks, and 18-wheelers.

Charles Bryan Alred, founding partner at Charles Bryan Alred, PC in Tulsa, OK, offered a reminder to motorists that snow is not the only weather-related factor that requires extra caution.

“In cold weather, ice is probably the biggest concern. Drivers know that it forms when the road is wet and the temperature drops, but it can also linger longer as the mercury rises. You may think you’re not in danger because it’s not freezing, then you hit a patch and lose control of your vehicle.”

In addition, black ice is a consideration during Oklahoma winters.

When a layer of ice forms on the surface of the road under certain conditions, it may appear wet instead of icy. Motorists on the lookout for glossy surfaces as an indication of ice may not realize that a dull, matte patch can be extremely dangerous black ice. This weather phenomenon tends to occur over night, which makes black ice a concern for commuters in and around Tulsa.

Mr. Alred also warned about other noteworthy weather conditions that affect Oklahoma motorists during the winter months.

“Even as you’re exercising extreme caution for snow, ice, and sleet, beware of the fog and wind – both of which can increase the risk of accidents. The primary issue with fog is visibility, while heavy breezes can create huge problems for higher profile vehicles.”

Regardless of the specifics behind them, motor vehicle accidents are typically a product of negligence, which involves a failure to exercise reasonable care behind the wheel. Victims can recover monetary damages by proving the other driver breached the duty of care, such as by not operating the vehicle safely in certain weather conditions.

Contact Tulsa Personal Injury Lawyer Charles Bryan Alred P.C. today to discuss your case.